Article Selection from “Bhagavad-Gita,” by Babu Nobin K. Bannerji | Note by H.P.B.

. . . many a sound scholar considers the Gita as quite a distinct work from and very injudiciously incorporated into the body of the Mahabharata. To this day, it is read and regarded by some Hindus as a record having no real connection with the Kurukshetra battle between the Pandavas and the Kouravas. And editions accordingly compiled can be had for sale in our bazaars.1 . . .

1. The idea that the Gita may after all be one of the ancient books of initiations—now most of them lost—has never occurred to them. Yet—like the Book of Job very wrongly incorporated into the Bible, since it is the allegorical and double record of (1) the Egyptian sacred mysteries in the temples and (2) of the disembodied Soul appearing before Osiris, and the Hall of Amenti, to be judged according to its Karma—the Gita is a record of the ancient teachings during the Mystery of Initiation.—Ed. [H.P.B.]