Question by Poorna Chundra Mookherji | Note by H.P.B.

. . . Now the great problem [facing the author as an archæological researcher] is to find out who built the structures, what their relation was to our continental history, contemporaneous events and chronology; and what was their local history, political, social, religious, and their position as to the fine arts. . . . I hear, psychometry is a great aid to the archæological. If so, how can I cultivate it? . . .

If our correspondent were but to read carefully Professor Denton’s The Soul of Things, he would realize the importance of the science of Psychometry and learn at the same time the mode of procedure. Its usefulness in archaeological discoveries and pursuits is immense. That work describes many cases in which the psychometer had but to hold against the forehead the fragment of a stone or any other object and he could accurately describe the building and its inhabitants if the fragment of stone had been connected with one; of the animal if the fragment was that of a bone of some fossil animal, etc., etc. The object is but the medium which puts the psychometer en rapport with the magnetic aura of its surroundings. Once landed in the world of Akasic impressions, the book of Nature is opened at every page and the images of all that was, being as though photographed on the etheric waves, they become plainly visible to the psychometer. Like many other faculties, this one is also inherent and must be developed by practice and study. But it is easy.